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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman

China is the only country in the world whose literature has been written in a single language for over 3,000 consecutive years. Early writings typically stemmed from religion, history and philosophy, however, China also produced poetry, novels, and dramatic writings from an early date.  Throughout history, literature in China has aimed to broaden perspectives and address social and political concerns. It served to create order in the world, explore man’s existence, his relationship with nature, and his moral conduct. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman

Digital art uses technology to combine and transform traditional artistic elements such as painting, film-making, photography, design, sculpture, animation, and sound. It was pioneered in the 1970’s but only came into its own as a viable art form as computers, software and digital video equipment began to saturate the mainstream public and increase in sophistication toward the end of the 20th century. Due to the global nature of the medium and artist-initiated, internet-based vehicles of exhibition, digital art both transcends and shatters traditional cultural and geographical boundaries. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman The Chinese are one of the earliest cultures to begin making jewelry, around 5,000 years ago. Chinese jewelry was inspired by religion, often featuring Buddhist symbols.  Jewelry was worn frequently by both men and women to show their nobility and wealth, and in later years, to accentuate beauty. Women wore highly detailed gold and silver headdresses and other items, while men wore decorative hat buttons to show their rank, and silver or gold rings. Women also wore bands of gold on their foreheads. This was an early type of tiara, often decorated with precious gems. The most common jewelry worn in China was earrings, worn by both men and women. Amulets with a Chinese symbol or dragon were also common. Dragons, Chinese symbols, and phoenixes are frequently found on Chinese jewelry designs. Most Chinese graves uncovered by archaeologists were found to contain decorative jewelry. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Contributed by Ronna Fleischman

Chinese painting is one of the oldest artistic traditions in the world.  Customarily, it is done with a brush dipped in ink much the same techniques as is used in calligraphy. Paintings are usually created on paper or silk and mounted on scrolls. The aim of the traditional Chinese painter is to capture not only the outer appearance of a subject but its inner essence as well—its energy and spirit.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

The art of paper-cutting (jiǎnzhǐ 剪纸) in China may date back to the second century C.E. since the paper was invented by Cai Lun in the Eastern Han Dynasty in China. As paper became more affordable, paper-cutting became one of the most important types of Chinese folk art. Later, this art form spread to other parts of the world, with different regions adopting their own cultural styles. Because the cut-outs are often used to decorate doors and windows, they are sometimes referred to as chuāng huā (窗花), window flowers or window paper-cuts. People glued the papercuts to the exterior of windows, so the light from the inside would shine through the negative space of the cutout. Usually, the artworks are made of red paper, as red is associated with festivities and happiness in Chinese culture, but other colors were also used. Normally paper-cutting artwork is used on festivals like Spring Festival, weddings, and childbirth. Papercuts always symbolize luck and happiness.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Chinese art is visual art that, whether ancient or modern, originated in or is practiced in China or by Chinese artists. The Chinese art in the Republic of China (Taiwan) and that of overseas Chinese can also be considered part of Chinese art where it is based in or draws on Chinese heritage and Chinese culture. Early "stone age art" dates back to 10,000 BC, mostly consisting of simple pottery and sculptures. After this early period Chinese art, like Chinese history, is typically classified by the succession of ruling dynasties of Chinese emperors, most of which lasted several hundred years.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Contributed by Ronna Fleischman Although China’s history of sculpture dates back over 6000 years, its ascension to a fine art form was slow to occur.  Until recent centuries, large sculptures were too expensive for private individuals to create.  Sculpture was most commonly an expression of religion and used to adorn temples and mausoleums. However, Chinese artists created smaller, delicate figures and animals using a number of raw materials from sand and wood, to jade and bronze. Many of these antiquities have become precious treasures of Chinese art. Read More 

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