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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman Characteristically, Chinese clothing is not only an external expression of elegance, but also contains cultural symbolism.  The Chinese associate certain colors with specific seasons: green represents spring, red symbolizes summer, white represents autumn, and black symbolizes winter. The Chinese have a fully developed system of matching, coordinating, and contrasting colors and shades of light and dark in their apparel. Traditionally, darker colors were favored over lighter ones.  Ceremonial clothing tended to be dark. Lighter colored clothing was worn more frequently by the common people for everyday, around the house use.  Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman China’s great cultural diversity, ancient history, and traditionally stratified society are all reflected in its footwear styles. The color, material, shape, and embellishment of shoes, boots, slippers, sandals, and clogs all played roles in expressing a person’s social status.  Shoes made of wood, textile, and vegetable fibers were worn by the laboring classes, while simple cloth shoes with layered soles were donned by the average citizen.  The shoes of the upper classes were made with sumptuous silks delicately embroidered with auspicious symbols. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

contributed by Ronna Fleischman From the chopping off of men’s long braids at the end of the Qing Dynasty to women making waves with chemical perms in the 1980s, hairstyles have been making a statement in China for centuries. Women’s fashions during the Tang Dynasty (618-907) mirrored the economic prosperity of the times with extravagant magnificence.  Hair was worn in plump chignons, often augmented with wigs and hairpieces and further ornamented with jewelry, flowers and wooden combs Later, both men and women began wearing their hair in coiled buns and using a hairpin to keep it in place. The hairpin was a symbol of personal dignity and social acceptance. Criminals were not allowed to wear them.  Women’s hair ornaments were more exquisite than men’s. A variety styles have been recorded in ancient documents. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Chinese clothing is ancient and modern as it has varied by region and time, and is recorded by the artifacts and arts of Chinese culture. Chinese clothing has been shaped through its dynastic traditions as well as foreign influences. Chinese clothing showcases the traditional fashion sensibilities of Chinese culture traditions and forms one of the major cultural facets of Chinese civilization.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

All students of fashion know how the 20th century transformed women’s clothing in the West. Corsets were loosened, hemlines rose, and designers like Coco Chanel and Yves Saint Laurent famously dressed ladies in trousers and tuxedo jackets. Read More 

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Chinese clothing changed considerably over the course of some 5,000 years of history, from the Bronze Age into the twentieth century, but also maintained elements of long-term continuity during that span of time. The story of dress in China is a story of wrapped garments in silk, hemp, or cotton, and of superb technical skills in weaving, dyeing, embroidery, and other textile arts as applied to clothing. After the Chinese Revolution of 1911, new styles arose to replace traditions of clothing that seemed inappropriate to the modern era. Read More 

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