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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

China has 34 major ports and more than 2000 minor ports. The former are mostly seaports (except for ports such as ShanghaiNanjing and Nantong along the Changjiang River and Guangzhou in the Pearl River delta) opening up to the Yellow sea (Bo Hai), Taiwan StraitsPearl River and South China Sea while the latter comprise ports that lie along the major and minor rivers of China. Most of China's major cities are also ports or are facilitated by a port nearby.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Visitors to the Mainland of the People's Republic of China must obtain a visa from one of the Chinese diplomatic missions unless they come from one of the visa exempt countries. The two Special Administrative Regions – Hong Kong and Macau – maintain their own independent border control policy and thus have their own visa requirements. Chinese visas are issued both outside China, by the Chinese diplomatic missions, and in China, by the Exit and Entry Administrations (EEAs) of the county-level Public Security Bureaus (PSBs). In order to enter China, however, a non-Chinese national should apply to the visa-issuing authorities outside China for a Chinese visa. Because Hong Kong and Macau maintain their independent border control policies, ordinary Chinese visas are valid for Mainland China only and are not valid for Hong Kong or Macau, so travelers must apply for separate visas for Hong Kong or Macau should they require one for traveling to these regions.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

Waves of Chinese emigration (also known as the Chinese diaspora) have happened throughout history. The mass emigration known as the Chinese diaspora, which occurred from the 19th century to 1949, was mainly caused by wars and starvation in mainland China, invasion from various foreign countries, as well as problems resulting from political corruption. Most immigrants were illiterate peasants and manual laborers, called "coolies" (Chinese苦力pinyinkǔ lì; literally: "hard labor"), who emigrated to work in places such as the AmericasAustraliaSouth AfricaSoutheast Asia, and Zealandia.

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Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Embassies | Leave a comment

Published Monday, November 19, 18 | By PaulvHill

The Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China regulates nationality of the People's Republic of China. Chinese nationality is usually obtained either by birth when at least one parent is of Chinese nationality or by naturalization. The constitution of the People's Republic of China states that all persons holding the nationality of China are citizens of China. Although in practice, the citizenship of Mainland China is the hukou, while the two special administrative regions, Hong Kong and Macau, each has its own rules on the rights of abode in these territories. In theory, the Chinese Nationality Law is de jure applicable to Chinese nationals residing in all three constituents of the People's Republic of China, namely Mainland ChinaHong Kong SAR, and Macau SAR. Due to the complex history of Hong Kong and Macau SARs, however, special "explanations" of the Nationality Law were made in place by the National People's Congress before the Handover of Hong Kong and Macau. These interpretations, applicable only to permanent residents of Hong Kong or Macau, have created a separate class of Chinese nationality unique to those two SARs, which differs vastly, especially with the acquisition and loss of nationality, from the Chinese nationality of Mainland Chinese residents with hukou.

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