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Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

Visitors to the Mainland of the People's Republic of China must obtain a visa from one of the Chinese diplomatic missions unless they come from one of the visa exempt countries. The two Special Administrative Regions – Hong Kong and Macau – maintain their own independent border control policy and thus have their own visa requirements. Chinese visas are issued both outside China, by the Chinese diplomatic missions, and in China, by the Exit and Entry Administrations (EEAs) of the county-level Public Security Bureaus (PSBs). In order to enter China, however, a non-Chinese national should apply to the visa-issuing authorities outside China for a Chinese visa. Because Hong Kong and Macau maintain their independent border control policies, ordinary Chinese visas are valid for Mainland China only and are not valid for Hong Kong or Macau, so travelers must apply for separate visas for Hong Kong or Macau should they require one for traveling to these regions.

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Immigrate & Visit | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

This is a place holder in preparation for a new and informative article on this topic.

There now is a team of three content writers for this the International Chinese Corner site.

New articles are added weekly and sometimes daily, so please check back soon.

Thank you

Posted in Embassies | Leave a comment

Published Saturday, September 22, 18 | By PaulvHill

The Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China regulates nationality of the People's Republic of China. Chinese nationality is usually obtained either by birth when at least one parent is of Chinese nationality or by naturalization. The constitution of the People's Republic of China states that all persons holding the nationality of China are citizens of China. Although in practice, the citizenship of Mainland China is the hukou, while the two special administrative regions, Hong Kong and Macau, each has its own rules on the rights of abode in these territories. In theory, the Chinese Nationality Law is de jure applicable to Chinese nationals residing in all three constituents of the People's Republic of China, namely Mainland ChinaHong Kong SAR, and Macau SAR. Due to the complex history of Hong Kong and Macau SARs, however, special "explanations" of the Nationality Law were made in place by the National People's Congress before the Handover of Hong Kong and Macau. These interpretations, applicable only to permanent residents of Hong Kong or Macau, have created a separate class of Chinese nationality unique to those two SARs, which differs vastly, especially with the acquisition and loss of nationality, from the Chinese nationality of Mainland Chinese residents with hukou.

Posted in Citizenship | Leave a comment